FO: Miel

Miel
Pattern: Miel
Yarn: Valley Yarns Northfield Hand Dyed by the Kangaroo Dyer (Lupine)
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I finished knitting my second Miel cardigan on Saturday. In the bright sun, it’s surprisingly difficult to photograph, and the shade is no better. But the sweater is nice, and hopefully purple is still the favorite color of the four-year-old Vivian, who is receiving this on Thursday.

Miel
Miel

FO: Babies Sophisticate

Babies Sophisticate
Pattern: Baby & Child Sophisticate
Yarn: Knit Picks Wool of the Andes Worsted Weight (left: Evergreen, Avocado; right: Indigo Heather, Seraphim)
View My Ravelry Project #1 / View My Ravelry Project #2

Baby Sophisticate is a fun, quick pattern. I chose it because I wanted a cute, mostly stockinette cardigan in a variety of sizes that I could customize with mosaic knitting. I used the charts from the Rusted Roof Shawl and Walk in the Woods.

In addition to the obvious addition of mosaic knitting, I also cast on two additional stitches, which I used for a slip stitch edge while working the garments. I then picked up the collar stitches from the slip stitch and cast on edges at a ratio of 1:1, because I’m a #lazyknitter and instructions like “pick up 1 sts for each garter stitch ridge, 3 sts for every 4 rows along sweater sides and 1 st for each cast on st around left edge” make me cringe. I’m happy with how both collars turned out.

If I did this again (and I might), I’d probably play around with the mosaic patterns a bit more. For the green version in particular, I should have added a stitch at the center back so that the fronts would be even. I also could have removed one mosaic repeat in favor of longer horizontal stripes in the front. I don’t totally love the way the fronts look on the green Sophisticate. But on the whole, I’m pleased with how these turned out.

FO: Miel

Miel
Miel
Pattern: Miel
Yarn: Valley Yarns Northfield Hand Dyed by the Kangaroo Dyer (Limoncello)
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My boyfriend’s sister is expecting her second child later this month, so knitting for the tiniest of humans has been back on my radar again. (I knit her first child seven sweaters before she was one.) I have a handful of patterns already picked out, but as soon as I saw Miel in my “Pattern Highlights,” I had to make it, and these two hanks of this Northfield yarn, which had been kicking around my stash for almost two years, seemed well suited for the pattern.

The day I cast on, I knitted to an inch and a half or so past dividing the body and sleeves. It is apparently an astonishingly fast pattern. I can’t decide if it was the combination of yarn and pattern or if I’ve somehow become a fast (English style) knitter, but this cardigan seemed to knit itself. I finished the body in a couple hours over the next two days. The sleeves materialized before me while I played board games and drank beer on Saturday night.

Miel

Not only was this a fast project, it was really enjoyable. The cardigan itself looks impressive, as, in my opinion, cables always do, but it’s also simply a pleasant, intuitive pattern. It’s the type of project you can multitask while working on. You can drink beer. You can play board games with friends. You can wait in line while you knit. You can watch TV and have conversations. And then you look down and see that, instead of needles and yarn, you’re now holding a sweater.

I think I like this yarn too. I’m curious to see how it wears, as some people complained about pilling on Ravelry. I already have plans to knit another — possibly two — in Northfield. We have friends with two young daughters, and I’d like to make their oldest a cardigan in the 4yo size. And I think my boyfriend’s niece will receive one of these when she turns two later this month. And really, that is, I think, one of the signs of a really good pattern: planning the next project before the first is off the needles.

FO: Palmyre

Palmyre
Palmyre
Pattern: Palmyre
Yarn: Madelinetosh Farm Twist (Oeste), Madelinetosh DK Twist (Sweet n Sour)
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Palmyre has been on and off my Ravelry queue since I first saw it a couple years ago, and I’m so pleased with how it turned out. This project went so quickly and effortlessly that I’m pretty certain it knit itself. And, as I recently mentioned, the Farm Twist was also a very nice yarn to work with.

I decided to do the bind off with a different yarn, just to give it an extra pop of color. The coral-like reddish edging matches some of the more subtle flecks of color found in the Oeste yarn, but I also briefly considered a bright green yarn and, halfway through binding off last night, it crossed my mind that the leftover Mineral from my French Cancan might look quite nice.

This shawl is most likely destined to become a gift, but I think I’ll have to knit one for myself.

Palmyre

A couple comments on kntting Palmyre: I often forget to weigh my yarn (as I did here), so I don’t know exactly how much I used, but I did need to break out the third hank of Oeste to finish the lace border. I was about five or six rows from the end of the chart. The only modification I made to the pattern was to knit a longer garter tab before picking up stitches, because I don’t like it when that gets too tight and causes a bump in the shawl. If I could do it all over again (and I probably will), I would experiment with slipping the outer edge of the garter tab, since that would better compliment the top edge of the shawl.

Palmyre

FO: French Cancan

French Cancan
French Cancan
Pattern: French Cancan
Yarn: Madelinetosh Tosh DK (Mineral)
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French Cancan has been in my Ravelry queue since July of last year and in my mental queue for even longer than that. I usually try to have an easy shawl going, especially when I’m working on fingering- or sport-weight projects, and the French Cancan’s mindless garter stitch and DK yarn was a good choice. The body of the shawl knits up very quickly, and the chart is easily memorized. Once I turned my attention to the border, it was completed in just a couple days.

I weighed my yarn as I knit, hoping to use up as much of it as possible. I started with 241g and knit the body until I had 103g left, approximately 42%. The pattern suggests leaving 40% for the applied lace edging, but I decided to err on the side of caution and avoid a game of yarn chicken. I still had 8g of yarn left when I completed the shawl, so I probably could have done a few more rows on the body.

FO: Meadow Road

Meadow Road
Pattern: Meadow Road
Yarn: Malabrigo Arroyo (Black)
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What a busy month! As a purchaser at a record store, I was swamped at work leading up to Record Store Day, so I wasn’t able to knit as much as I would have liked to this month, but 22 April has come and gone, and I was finally able to complete my Meadow Road pullover on 24 April! My goal was to finish it in time for the spring, and I’ve definitely accomplished that.

According to my Ravelry project page, I started this on 9 January, but I worked on it very sporadically at first. This pullover can definitely be knit in fewer than three months. The center pattern is incredibly intuitive and easy to memorize, and it’s otherwise just lots of stockinette. Lemon squeezy, as they say.

Meadow Road
Meadow Road

Meadow Road is the pattern that made me love twisted ribbing. I really like how it makes those columns of knits and purls so neat and tidy. The hem on the body is only twisted on the knit stitches, but when I worked the cuffs and the neckband, I twisted the purl stitches too.

And speaking of the cuffs and neckband, I made some changes to the original pattern, which called for gathered sleeves and reverse stockinette edging. I omitted both of these. Working the sleeves two-at-a-time, I continued decreasing to what seemed like an appropriate width, and then I added 8 rounds of ribbing before binding off loosely. For the neckband, I picked up either 132 or 134 stitches and again worked 8 rounds of ribbing. I didn’t change my needle size.

I’m very happy with how my Meadow Road turned out. In my experience, Arroyo grows in length and, to a lesser degree, width, and this ended up being the perfect size after blocking. It ends a couple inches below my hip and is has a comfortable / casual fit throughout the body and sleeves.

FO: Pathway

Pathway
Pathrway
Pattern: Pathway
Yarn: Cascade 220 (Christmas Red)
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Although I’m still not someone who enjoys knitting scarves, I have to admit that this one was very satisfying to make once I found my rhythm. Initially, I worked on it an hour here, an hour and a half there, so every time I picked the project up, I had to consult the chart. But on Saturday, I finally had a day to focus on finishing this and was able to memorize the pattern and breeze through the remaining 50% of the project.

From cast on to bind off, I made absolutely no modifications to the pattern. If memory serves (it probably doesn’t), I knit 40 repetitions of the chart. It ended up being a generous 84″ long and almost 9″ wide. I blocked it pretty aggressively, because I wanted to make sure that the ribbing, which flanks the textured panel and the cable, looked like ribbing and not a wide block of stockinette.

Pathway
Pathway

As with the Ginkgo scarf I finished last month, I knit this as a favor for the mister’s step-mother, who is giving some friends a gift basket of handmade goods.